Writing
Tales
History
Geography
Natural History
Picture Study
Foreign Language
Math
Brush Drawing
Recitations
Reading
Music
Music Appreciation
Singing
Drill
Work
World Religions, Philosophy and Logic


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Writing

The PNEU programmes specified a particular handwriting program to be used.  She felt that handwriting should be beautiful, and recommended in Book 1 printing before cursive.  There is current controversy over print-first vs cursive-first.  We recommend you do your own research and choose what is right for your family.

The program that CM used and recommended is similar to today’s italic handwriting.  We recognize that not everyone will want to use italics.

A few handwriting programs to consider:

Two letters to be mastered each lesson.  Transcribe from reading books, and write words and short sentences from dictation.

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Tales

  • Term 1

Tales of Troy and Greece by Andrew Lang, 4-5 pages per week
The Legends of King Arthur and His Knights by Sir James Knowles, 5-6 pages per week

*Note:  Tales of Troy and Greece and The Legends of King Arthur and His Knights are both scheduled over a two year period.  Because different editions have different page counts, we recommend you look at the total number of pages for each book, and divide that by 6.  Shoot for reading that number of pages per term.

— [optional] The Boy Who Drew Cats and Other Japanese Fairy Tales by Lafcadio Hearn and Others (Dover Children’s Thrift Classics) — choose 6 tales

— [optional] (Hero Tales)   George Washington by Ingri d’Aulaire
OR
                                                 Bully for You, Teddy Roosevelt by Jean Fritz

  • Term 2

Tales of Troy and Greece by Andrew Lang, 4-5 pages per week
The Legends of King Arthur and His Knights by Sir James Knowles, 5-6 pages per week

— [optional] African Folk Tales by Hugh Vernon-Jackson (Dover Children’s Thrift Classics) — choose 6 tales

— [optional] (Hero Tales)  Christopher Columbus by Ingri d’Aulaire
OR
Leif the Lucky by Ingri d’Aulaire

  • Term 3

Tales of Troy and Greece by Andrew Lang, 4-5 pages per week
The Legends of King Arthur and His Knights by Sir James Knowles, 5-6 pages per week

[optional] Irish Fairy Tales edited by Philip Smith (Dover Children’s Thrift Classics) — choose 6 tales

— [optional] (Hero Tales)  Rachel Carson: Pioneer of Ecology by Kathleen V. Kudlinski
OR
One Beetle Too Many by Kathryn Lasky (Charles Darwin)

NOTE:  D’Aulaire’s books vary in how strong their Christian viewpoint comes through.  Some of their books it’s practically unnoticeable, while others it’s much stronger.  They are strong literature choices and have wonderful pictures, but please pre-read or be prepared to edit on the fly if this is an issue for you.  Christopher Columbus in particular is very Christian.

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History (of your own country)

(Note: United States is listed here; if you are Canadian, look at the Options page for other suggestions)

Please read this blog post for a discussion of America First.

  • Term 1

America First by Lawton Evans.

 King George and the Colonies; Patrick Henry and the Parson’s Cause; Paul Revere’s Ride; The Green Mountain Boys; The Father of His Country; Nathan Hale; The Bravery of Elizabeth Zane; Capturing the Hessians; How LaFayette Came to America; The Patriotism of Lydia Darrah

*Note:  there is very little background given as to the reasons or start of the Revolutionary War.  You may want to give your children some background information in an object lesson or an informal discussion.  However, it is not strictly necessary.  We will be revisiting the Revolutionary War twice more in their school careers, and a 7/8 year old doesn’t necessarily need to have a thorough understanding of it.

 

  • Term 2

America First by Lawton Evans  (not all stories are read – use the following)

Captain Molly Pitcher; Marion, The Swamp Fox; Outwitting a Tory; How General Schuyler Was Saved; How the Northwest Was Won; Benjamin Franklin; Nolichucky Jack; Eli Whitney and the Cotton Gin; Thomas Jefferson; The Burning of the Philadelphia

— [optional bio]   Benjamin Franklin by Ingri d’Aulaire
OR
                            Crazy Horse’s Vision by Joseph Bruchac

  • Term 3

America First by Lawton Evans.  (we don’t use all stories; use the following)

The Expedition of Lewis and Clark; Colter’s Race for Life; Pike Explores the Arkansas Valley; Old Ironsides; Tecumseh; The Star-Spangled Banner; Traveling by the Canal; An Early Journey by Railroad; Old Hickory; Daniel Webster

–[optional bio]  A Boy Called Slow by Joseph Bruchac
OR                     Buffalo Bird Girl by S. D. Nelson

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Geography

  • Term 1

Elementary Geography by Charlotte Mason (or on google books as Geographical Readers for Elementary Schools) :  Hot Countries and Cold Countries, Parts I and II; Parallel Lines

—  Paddle to the Sea by Holling C. Holling, chapters 1-12

— Children to be able to tell about 6 places father and mother have visited.

— Six map questions before readings, then reading and narration; no additional material to be introduced  (before starting the readings, have an atlas out with the area of the reading shown.  Ask questions about the area, point out rivers and mountains, etc.  This should take only a few minutes)

 

  • Term 2

Elementary Geography by Charlotte Mason : Sunrise and Sunset; Why the Sun Rises and Sets; Mid-Day Lines

—  Paddle to the Sea by Holling C. Holling, chapters 13-24

— Pace distance on each of four 4 roads for 2, 4, 5, and 6 minutes and say in each case in which direction you are walking.

— Children to be able to tell about 6 places father and mother have visited.

— Six map questions before readings, then reading and narration; no additional material to be introduced

 

  • Term 3

Elementary Geography by Charlotte Mason :  The Points of a Compass; The Mariner’s Compass; The Plan of a Room; The Plan of a Town

—  Paddle to the Sea by Holling C. Holling, chapters 25-27

—  I, Matthew Henson: Polar Explorer by Carole Boston Weatherford
OR
Trapped by the Ice! Shackleton’s Amazing Antarctic Adventure by Michael McCurdy

— Children to be able to tell about 6 places father and mother have visited.

— Six map questions before readings, then reading and narration; no additional material to be introduced

—  Pace and make plans of the length and breadth of 4 rooms, 2 passages, and 2 garden walks.

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Natural History

Keep a Nature Note-Book.  Click here for nature study resources.

[because you may be starting in any season, be sure to do fruits in autumn, twigs in winter, flowers in spring]

  • Term 1

Find and describe (a) 6 wild fruits; watch, if possible, and describe (b) ten birds, (c) five other animals.

— Trees and Shrubs by Arabella Buckley, ch 1-6
By Pond and River by Arabella Buckley (entire)
The Look About You Nature Study Book, Book 3 by Thomas W. Hoare p 1-29

  • Term 2

Find and describe (a) 6 twigs of trees; watch, if possible, and describe (b) ten birds, (c) five other animals.

— Trees and Shrubs by Arabella Buckley, ch 7-13
The Look About You Nature Study Book, Book 3 by Thomas W. Hoare, p 30-end
The Look About You Nature Study Book, Book 2 by Thomas W. Hoare, ch 1-2

  • Term 3

Find and describe (a) 6 wild flowers; watch, if possible, and describe (b) ten birds, (c) five other animals.

— Birds of the Air by Arabella Buckley, ch 1-8 (continued in upper 1A)
The Look About You Nature Study Book, Book 2 by Thomas W. Hoare, ch 3-end

*note — The Look About You Nature Study Book, Book 3 begins with more accessible activities than does Book 2, so we start with that book first.

* All Arabella Buckley books are available in print and ebook from www.yesterdaysclassics.com  For a pdf version from archive.org, click here

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Picture Study

Click here for this term’s selections

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Foreign Language

Choose a foreign language spoken widely in your area, or one that is culturally relevant for your family.  We suggest Spanish or French, depending on where you live.  For 1B, work should be entirely oral.  Though we have not used it ourselves, the language programs from Cherrydale Press come recommended.  Please see Home Education for further instruction on how to teach this subject.

*Learn at least 1 children’s song in the target language each term.  It is preferable to listen to CDs sung by native speakers.

Click here for other resources.

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Math

Use the math program of your choice.

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Brush Drawing

Click here for parent resources. [Since you may be starting in any season, remember fruits in autumn, twigs in winter, flowers in spring.]

  • Term 1

6 wild fruits and (from memory) 6 animals you’ve been able to watch; scenes from your Tales, in brushwork.  Children should draw occasionally in brush or chalk from memory.  Pencils should not much be used.

  • Term 2

6 twigs of trees and (from memory) 6 animals you’ve been able to watch; scenes from your Tales, in brushwork.  Children should draw occasionally in brush or chalk from memory.  Pencils should not much be used.

  • Term 3

6 wild flowers and (from memory) 6 animals you’ve been able to watch; scenes from your Tales, in brushwork.  Children should draw occasionally in brush or chalk from memory.  Pencils should not much be used.

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Recitations

Focus on one poem per week, reading the same one every day, but also reading a few other poems of choice.    Read at meals, tea times, in the evenings, etc.

  • All Terms

A Child’s Book of Poems illustrated by Gyo Fujikawa (cont’d from 1B)

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Reading

Poetry and books used for History, Geography, and Tales, if the student is a strong reader.  Otherwise, use your choice of early readers.

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Music

Piano resources:  Faber Piano Adventures

Free piano resources:  Hoffman Academy  Let’s Play Music

The PNEU programmes that we based this curriculum on specify piano; however, we understand that many of us don’t have access to one.  We humbly suggest that learning any instrument is better than learning no instrument. To that end, here are two other programs that come highly recommended:

Nine Note Recorder Method (Penny Gardner)
Living Music from the Heart (the penny whistle — this is a Waldorf resource)

If an instrument is not an option, Legends of the Staff of Musique  teaches music fundamentals through singing (based on Kodaly method).  It is written directly to the homeschool parent and presumes no prior music background.  It brings in Waldorf elements such as storytelling, but is fully compatible with a Charlotte Mason education.  It is wonderful and we highly recommend it.

Jolly Music Handbook is also based on the Kodaly method, and the Beginners level covers the same material as Legends of the Staff Level 1.  It is written for the classroom teacher and some activities will need to be modified or skipped for the homeschool classroom.  The material is sound, but the activities are not as engaging in a one-on-one setting as they would be in a classroom.

This page from Charlotte Mason Help has good ideas for learning an instrument inexpensively:  Learn to Play Piano on a Shoestring

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Music Appreciation

Click here for the current year’s choices

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Singing

All Terms:

Two children’s songs in the second language you are learning.
Solfa or sight-singing instruction.

For current year’s Song Rotation click here, or to coordinate song choices with history click here [coming soon]

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Drill

Two types of drill are mentioned specifically in Home Education:  Drill in good manners, and Swedish drill.  Swedish drill is a specific set of movements for grace and physical education.    Here is one example from the era.   Swedish drill was not simply free play.

As to drill in good manners, the following is from Home Education:

Just let them go through the drill of good manners: let them rehearse little scenes in play,––Mary, the lady asking the way to the market; Harry, the boy who directs her, and so on. Let them go through a position drill––eyes right, hands still, heads up. They will invent a hundred situations, and the behavior proper to each, and will treasure hints thrown in for their guidance; but this sort of drill should be attempted while children are young, before the tyranny of mauvaise honte sets in.  Encourage them to admire and take pride in light springing movements, and to eschew a heavy gait and clownish action of the limbs.

Swedish drill can be replaced with yoga for children.  There are several options available.  If yoga is a sticking point due to personal beliefs, it is by no means a requirement.

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Work

Helpful resources for all terms, but not essential (more resources here):

Sewing School by Andria Lisle
Roots, Shoots, Buckets, and Boots by Sharon Lovejoy
Kids Knitting by Melanie Falick or A First Book of Knitting by Bonne Gosse
Martha Stewart’s Favorite Crafts for Kids by the editors of Martha Stewart Living

  • Term 1

— Help in house or garden
sew a felt needle book, or choose a project from Sewing School
— knit a small washcloth (1 square) or bean bag (2 squares hand sewn together with yarn.  Put beans inside an old nylon stocking and sew up, so  they don’t come through the knit holes.  Or use large beans)
— Origami (6  models) or paper books – Resources
— family craft: felt ornament making (older students embroider, younger students draw; stuff with batting and use embroidery thread)

  • Term 2

— Help in house or garden
— sew a dog door-draft stopper, or choose a project from Sewing School
— knit a scurvy eye patch, or choose a project from knitting book
— Origami (6 models) or paper books – Resources
— volunteer work

  • Term 3

— Help in house or garden
— sew a felt ribbon bookmark,  or choose a project from Sewing School
— learn to purl: knit a basketweave washcloth or choose a project from knitting book
— Origami (6 models) or paper books – Resources
clay or beeswax modelling (see our notes on the Options page)

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World Religions, Philosophy and Logic

Charlotte Mason’s original curriculum included comprehensive Bible readings alongside optional Sunday readings. Wildwood encourages each family to include books on their own spiritual traditions, and as those are so plentiful, it would impossible for us to include them all. As an alternative, we offer some suggestions for those who may be interested in readings on World Religions, Philosophy or Logic.

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The following instructions are taken directly from the PNEU programmes:

  • In home schoolrooms where there are children in A as well as B, both forms may work together, doing the work of A or B as they are able.
  • For methods of teaching the various subjects, see Home Education and School Education.