Writing
Tales
History
Geography
Natural History
Picture Study
Foreign Language
Math
Brush Drawing
Recitations
Reading
Music
Music Appreciation
Singing
Drill
Work
World Religions, Philosophy and Logic


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Writing

The PNEU programmes specified a particular handwriting program to be used.  Charlotte Mason felt that handwriting should be beautiful, and recommended in Book 1 printing before cursive.  There is current controversy over print-first vs cursive-first.  We recommend you do your own research and choose what is right for your family.

The program that CM used and recommended is similar to today’s italic handwriting.  We recognize that not everyone will want to use italics.

A few handwriting programs to consider:

After initial strokes are mastered, one letter to be mastered each lesson.  To be able to write, or print, letters and words from dictation as well as from copy (see Home Education page 234).

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Tales

  • Term 1

— 3  Fairy Tales.  Andrew Lang’s Blue Fairy Book, or your favorite book of fairy tales.
— 3 Aesop’s fables (published by Dover or Scholastic)
— Beatrix Potter series: (read one per week)

The Tale of Peter Rabbit

The Tale of Squirrel Nutkin

The Tailor of Gloucester

The Tale of Benjamin Bunny

The Tale of Two Bad Mice

The Tale of Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle

The Tale of the Pie and the Patty-Pan

The Tale of Mr. Jeremy Fisher

The Story of a Fierce Bad Rabbit

The Story of Miss Moppet

The Tale of Tom Kitten

  • Term 2

— 3 Fairy Tales.   Andrew Lang’s Blue Fairy Book, or your favorite book of fairy tales.
— 3 Aesop’s Fables
— Beatrix Potter series (one per week)

The Tale of Jemima Puddle-Duck

The Tale of Samuel Whiskers or, The Roly-Poly Pudding

The Tale of the Flopsy Bunnies

The Tale of Ginger and Pickles

The Tale of Mrs. Tittlemouse

The Tale of Timmy Tiptoes

The Tale of Mr. Tod

The Tale of Pigling Bland

Appley Dapply’s Nursery Rhymes

The Tale of Johnny Town-Mouse

Cecily Parsley’s Nursery Rhymes

The Tale of Little Pig Robinson

  • Term 3

— 3 Fairy Tales.  Andrew Lang’s Blue Fairy Book, or your favorite book of fairy tales.
— 3 Aesop’s Fables
Just So Stories  by Rudyard Kipling

Note: If this is your child’s first experience with fairy tales, Classic Fairy Tales by Scott Gustafson is a wonderful collection of ten lavishly illustrated tales.

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History (of your own country- check the options page for Canadian option)

  • Term 1

— American Tall Tales  by Mary Pope Osborne.  Davy Crockett; Sally Ann Thunderwind Whirlwind; Johnny Appleseed

John Henry by Julius Lester and Jerry Pinkney (note — the story of John Henry is also in Mary Pope Osborne’s book, but this version is so wonderful we feel it is worth getting separately.  You may simply read the story in American Tall Tales if you wish)

Schedule one tall tale every three weeks.  Read each in 2 or 3 sessions.

  • Term 2

— American Tall Tales  by Mary Pope Osborne.  Paul Bunyan; Pecos Bill.  (take 6 weeks)

America First by Lawton Evans.  (Not all stories are read – use the following.  Begin approximately halfway through the term, once tall tales are completed.)

Leif the Lucky; The Lost Colony of Roanoke; Persecutions of the Pilgrims and Puritans;  Building a Canoe;  The Flight of Roger Williams.

  • Term 3

America First by Lawton Evans.  (not all stories are read)

Old Silver Leg;  William Penn and the Quakers; The Charter Oak;  Bloody Marsh; The Saving of Hadley;  Sir William Phips and the Treasure Ship; The Story of Acadia; Blackbeard the Pirate;  The Salem Witches; Traveling by Stage-Coach

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Geography

  • Term 1

Elementary Geography by Charlotte Mason (or on google books as Geographical Readers for Elementary Schools)  Our World – Part I and Part II
Children of the Northlights by Ingri d’Aulaire

–Make in a tray of sand, islands, isthmuses, straits, mountains, lakes.

  • Term 2

Elementary Geography by Charlotte Mason (or on google books as Geographical Readers for Elementary Schools): Our World & Other Worlds – Parts I & II, Day and Night
Jenny Goes to Sea by Esther Averill.  Begin about halfway into term, reading approx one chapter per week.  Read the first 6 chapters this term.

— Make in a tray of sand, valleys, rivers, hills, villages.

  • Term 3

Elementary Geography by Charlotte Mason (or on google books as Geographical Readers for Elementary Schools):  Poles and Axis, The Four Seasons Parts 1 & 2
Jenny Goes to Sea by Esther Averill.  Finish, reading approx one chapter per week.

— Describe, and tell the boundaries of 3 fields.

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Natural History

Keep a Nature Note-Book.    Click here for nature study resources.

[because you may be starting in any season, be sure to do fruits in autumn, twigs in winter, flowers in spring]

  • Term 1

Find and describe (a) 6 wild fruits; watch, if possible, and describe (b) ten birds, (c) five other animals. [interpret ‘birds and other animals’ loosely]

Wildlife in Woods and Field by Arabella Buckley (Eyes and No Eyes Series)

The Wonders of the Jungle, Book 1 by Prince Ghosh, ch 1-5 [some references to ‘the animals God made’ and ‘God’s creation’.  Click here for other options]

  • Term 2

Find and describe (a) 6 twigs of trees; watch, if possible, and describe (b) ten birds, (c) five other animals. [interpret ‘birds and other animals’ loosely]

Plant Life in Field and Garden by Arabella Buckley (Eyes and No Eyes Series), ch 1-7

The Wonders of the Jungle, Book 1 by Prince Ghosh, ch 6-10

  • Term 3

Find and describe (a) 6 wild flowers; watch, if possible, and describe (b) ten birds, (c) five other animals. [interpret ‘birds and other animals’ loosely]

Plant Life in Field and Garden by Arabella Buckley (Eyes and No Eyes Series),  ch 8-16

The Wonders of the Jungle, Book 1 by Prince Ghosh, ch 11-end

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Picture Study 

Click here for this term’s selections

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Foreign Language

Choose a foreign language spoken widely in your area, or one that is culturally relevant for your family.  We suggest Spanish or French, depending on where you live.  For 1B, work should be entirely oral.  Though we have not used them ourselves, the language programs from Cherrydale Press come recommended.  Please see Home Education for further instruction on how to teach this subject.

*Learn at least 1 children’s song in the target language each term.  It is preferable to listen to CDs sung by native speakers.

Click here for other language programs.

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Math

Use the math program of your choice.   Manipulatives like dominoes and beans should be used.  See Arithmetic in Home Education, page 253.

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Brush Drawing

Click here for parent resources.

  • Term 1

6 wild fruits and (from memory) 6 animals you’ve been able to watch; scenes from your Tales, in brushwork.  Children should draw occasionally in brush or chalk from memory.  [interpret ‘animals’ loosely]

  • Term 2

6 twigs of trees and (from memory) 6 animals you’ve been able to watch; scenes from your Tales, in brushwork.  Children should draw occasionally in brush or chalk from memory. [interpret ‘animals’ loosely]

  • Term 3

6 wild flowers and (from memory) 6 animals you’ve been able to watch; scenes from your Tales, in brushwork.  Children should draw occasionally in brush or chalk from memory. [interpret ‘animals’ loosely]

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Recitations

Focus on one poem per week, reading the same one every day, but also reading a few other poems of choice.  Read at meals, tea times, in the evenings, etc.

  • All Terms

 A Child’s Book of Poems by Gyo Fujikawa
OR Tomie dePaola’s Mother Goose

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Reading

Teach reading as in Home Education, or by using a program

Suggested:

Easy Readers series:

  • Little Bear (Else Holmelund Minaret)
  • Ling and Ting (Grace  Lin) – Chinese-American twins
  • Flicka, Ricka, Dicka (Maj Lindman) – Swedish girls
  • Snipp, Snapp, Snur (Maj Lindman) – Swedish boys
  • Frog and Toad – Arnold Loebel (and other series by this author)
  • Amelia Bedelia (Peggy Parish) – note that the series has been continued by her nephew, Herman Parish.
  • The Fire Cat (Esther Averill)
  • Penny and Her Song (and others in this series, by Kevin Henkes)
  • Early Readers series by Shelley Davidow

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Music

Piano resources:  Faber Piano Adventures
Progressive Piano Method for Young Beginners

Free piano resources:  Hoffman Academy  Let’s Play Music

The PNEU programmes that we based this curriculum on specify piano; however, we understand that many of us don’t have access to one.  We humbly suggest that learning any instrument is better than learning no instrument. To that end, here are two other programs that come highly recommended:

Nine Note Recorder Method (Penny Gardner)
Living Music from the Heart (the penny whistle — this is a Waldorf resource)

If an instrument is not an option, Jolly Music Handbook teaches music fundamentals through singing (based on Kodaly method).

This page from Charlotte Mason Help has good ideas for learning an instrument inexpensively:  Learn to Play Piano on a Shoestring

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Music Appreciation — Children’s Classics

  • Term 1

Britten’s “A Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra”
Prokofiev’s “Peter and the Wolf”
Dukas’s “The Sorceror’s Apprentice”

  • Term 2

Biget’s “Jeux d’Enfants”
Humperdinck’s “Hansel and Gretel”
Ridout’s “Ferdinand”
Rossini’s “Duet for Two Cats”  students will also enjoy this version.

  • Term 3

Coates’s “Three Bears Suite”
Ravel’s “Mother Goose”
Camille Saint-Sean – Carnival of the Animals
Rossini’s “William Tell Overture”

Menotti’s “Amahl and the Night Visitors” (this is quite religious, and while delightful, could easily be omitted. )

Note — You may choose to use the Composer Rotation, especially if you have older children.  If so, we recommend using the Composer Rotation in addition to, rather than instead of, the Children’s Classics.

Amahl and the Night Visitors and Peter and the Wolf are both scheduled in the composer rotation for opera, as an either/or choice.  You may choose to skip one or the other this year, or simply re-watch or listen to them when they show up in the composer rotation.  Beautiful music does not need to be experienced only once.

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Singing

Resources: Wee Sing Children’s Songs and Finger Plays; Mary Thienes-Shunemann Lavenders Blue Dilly Dilly;  Raffi; Lisa Loeb Nursery Rhyme Parade (Amazon Prime free streaming)

Form 1B is the only Form that doesn’t say ‘learn X number of English songs’ but instead lists The Joyous Book of Singing Games as a resource.  These are action songs, some nursery rhymes, and fun games typically played as a group.  We have been unable to find anything comparable not geared towards classroom use (ie, that doesn’t expect a group of 15 or more children at hand).  Going with the spirit of the book, we instead suggest nursery rhymes and action games.   We recommend you continue with these even if your children learned them at age 3, and even if you add in the singing rotation with your older children.  Use other songs in addition to, not instead of, action songs and nursery rhymes.  Don’t limit yourself to just these suggestions.  There are many more songs that are suitable.

  • Term 1

Lavender’s Blue, Dilly Dilly; Sing a Song of Sixpence; Hickory Dickory Dock; Baa Baa Black Sheep; The Farmer in the Dell; The Grand Old Duke of York; London Bridge Is Falling Down; I’m A Little Teapot; The Itsy Bitsy Spider; B-I-N-G-O; Do Your Ears Hang Low

  • Term 2

The Bear Went Over the Mountain; If You’re Happy And You Know It; Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes; Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush; The Wheels on the Bus;  Mary Had A Little Lamb; The Muffin Man; Old King Cole; A-Hunting We Will Go; The Green Grass Grew All Around; How Much Is That Doggie In the Window?

  • Term 3

This Old Man; Pop Goes the Weasel; Ring around the Rosie; Aikendrum; Kookaburra; Froggie Went a-Courting; Skip to My Lou; Shoo Fly Don’t Bother Me; This Is The Way (We Wash Our Clothes); The Hokey Pokey;  Row Row Row Your Boat; I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly

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Drill

Two types of drill are mentioned specifically in Home Education:  Drill in good manners, and Swedish drill.  Swedish drill is a specific set of movements for grace and physical education.    Here is one example from the era.   Swedish drill was not simply free play.

As to drill in good manners, the following is from Home Education:

Just let them go through the drill of good manners: let them rehearse little scenes in play,––Mary, the lady asking the way to the market; Harry, the boy who directs her, and so on. Let them go through a position drill––eyes right, hands still, heads up. They will invent a hundred situations, and the behavior proper to each, and will treasure hints thrown in for their guidance; but this sort of drill should be attempted while children are young, before the tyranny of mauvaise honte sets in.  Encourage them to admire and take pride in light springing movements, and to eschew a heavy gait and clownish action of the limbs.

Swedish drill can be replaced with yoga for children.  There are several options available.  If yoga is a sticking point due to personal beliefs, it is by no means a requirement.

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Work

Helpful resources for all terms (more resources here):

Sewing School by Andria Lisle
Roots, Shoots, Buckets, and Boots by Sharon Lovejoy
Kids Knitting by Melanie Falick or A First Book of Knitting by Bonne Gosse
Martha Stewart’s Favorite Crafts for Kids by the editors of Martha Stewart Living

  • Term 1

— Help in house or garden
— pre-sewing:  sew on a disposable plate or plastic canvas with yarn
fingerknitting
for advanced fingerknitters, an Easy Finger Knitting Bunny
— Simple paper folding — fan, cup, box

  • Term 2

— Help in house or garden
— sew a felt pattern,  or choose a project from Sewing School
— knit stitch:  knit a bookmark (cast on 15 stitches, knit 8 or so rows, cast off, add fringe) or choose a project from your knitting book
— Simple origami models – 4

  • Term 3

— Help in house or garden
— sew a small pillow for a stuffed animal (straight stitch and whipstitch) , or choose a project from Sewing School
— knit stitch:  a simple cat , or choose a project from your knitting book
— Simple origami – 4
clay or beeswax modelling (see our notes on the Options page)

 

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World Religions, Philosophy and Logic

Charlotte Mason’s original curriculum included comprehensive Bible readings alongside optional Sunday readings. Wildwood encourages each family to include books on their own spiritual traditions, and as those are so plentiful, it would be impossible for us to include them all. As an alternative, we offer some suggestions for those who may be interested in readings on World Religions, Philosophy or Logic.

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The following instructions are taken directly from the PNEU programmes:

  • In home schoolrooms where there are children in A as well as B, both forms may work together, doing the work of A or B as they are able.
  • For methods of teaching the various subjects, see Home Education and School Education.