Writing
Dictation
Composition
Grammar
History
Secondary History
General History
Citizenship
Geography
Natural History
Picture Study
Latin
Math
Foreign Language
Drawing
Recitations
Reading
Music
Music Appreciation
Singing
Drill
Work
World Religions, Philosophy and Logic


Writing

Every term:

Continue with handwriting instruction and practice as necessary.

Transcribe some of your favorite passages from this term’s Shakespeare selection, or from Poetry Books. Two perfectly written lines every day.

[the programmes say “A New Handwriting by M. M. Bridges; teacher to study instructions: practice card 3. Transcribe, with card 6 as model, some of your favourite passages from Shakespeare’s As You Like It, or from Poetry Books set. Two perfectly written lines every day.”]

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Dictation

Each term:

Two pages at a time to be prepared carefully, then a paragraph from one of these pages to be written from dictation, or, occasionally, from memory.

Use the books set for reading and citizenship. Words not known to be visualized (see Home Education, pp 240-243).

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Composition

— Written or oral narration daily after each lesson.
— Stories from work set in (a) History and Reading, or, (b) events of the day, etc, from well-written papers. Verses on famous people you are reading about, in the meters of poems read.
— Two written narrations at the end of two lessons each day (10 minutes).

Written narrations longer than 10 minutes should not be required. If your child still struggles with the physical act of writing, you may decrease this requirement at your discretion; however, you will still want to require oral narrations.

Though most written narrations should be from the lessons, occasionally write poetry on heroic deeds, or write narrations about current events if you are taking the Optional current events magazines. This could be simple narrations or more complex opinion pieces after discussion.  Read this page from Charlotte Mason Help about poetic narrations:  Poetic Narrations Demystified

While Charlotte Mason did not advocate formal writing instruction at this age, we recognize that some will want to or be required to provide this. Click here for suggested programs.

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 English Grammar

From the programmes: Parse and point out Subjects, Verbs, Objects, every week, making progress each term.

Poetry:

  • Term 1:
    A Short Grammar of the English Tongue, p 166-167, Lesson 7: End-Rhyme

    • Continue with previously learned skills.
    • Continue writing verse.
    • Identify end-rhyme in poems read
  • Terms 2 & 3:

    • Continue with previously learned skills. Reinforce where necessary.

Grammar:

All terms:

KISS Grammar (click here for how to navigate the website).

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 US History

Note:  if you don’t live in the U.S. see Users from Other Countries

Take a current events magazine for students.

  • Term 1

— The Landmark History of the American People Volume 1 by Daniel J. Boorstin, Chapters 19-24

  • Term 2

–Landmark History Volume 1 ch 25-end, Volume 2 Ch 1-2

–Children of the Wild West by Russell Freedman –OR– The Navajo Long Walk by Joseph Bruchac (goes in and out of availability)

  • Term 3

–Landmark History, Volume 2, Ch 3-9

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 Secondary History – British History

Note:  if you don’t live in the U.S. see History for Users from Other Countries

Please check the Form II Options page for a fuller discussion of other options.

  • Term 1:

The Story of Britain: From the Norman Conquest to the European Union by Patrick Dillon (AMZ) pages 229-241 OR pages 229-251

  • Term 2:

The Story of Britain: From the Norman Conquest to the European Union by Patrick Dillon (AMZ) pages 252-258 OR pages 242-276

  • Term 3:

The Story of Britain: From the Norman Conquest to the European Union by Patrick Dillon (AMZ) pages 258-276 OR a supplemental book about Victorian Britain (about 50 pages long)

(NB: The remainder of this book will be finished in Form 3.)

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General History

Keep a Book of Centuries,  putting in illustrations from all the history studied during the term (your country, neighboring country, general, and religious/philosophy if you are studying those).

Visit local museums.  If you are near a large history museum, consider focusing on one area or time period this term.

  • Term 1:

— A Picturesque Tale of Progress, Explorations II (Book 8) p 31-85 Ancient America, The Brilliant Civilization of the Maya (stop before Story of Creation)

  • Term 2:

— Explorations II, p 86-134, The Brilliant Civilization of the Maya (Story of Creation to end)

  • Term 3:  Explorations II, cont’d

— The Conquest of Mexico: Aztec Conquerors p135-148
— (Optional: The Spanish in America p 149-174)
— Ancient Peru p 218-231

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 Citizenship

Each term:

current term’s life from Plutarch’s Lives. Use a Classical Dictionary and Classical Atlas of your choice, as desired.

The Atlas of Ancient and Classical Geography by Samuel Butler

Classical Dictionary by William Smith

Because countries are set up differently, we need to use different books for citizenship. If you are not in the US/UK/Canada, try to find materials that cover citizenship for your own country.

U.S.

  • Term 1:

The Young Citizen’s Reader by Paul Reinsch, updated by Lisa Ripperton (Yesterday’s Classics), Parts XX-XIV (p 105-134)

  • Term 2:

Parts XXV-XXX (p 135-168)

  • Term 3:

Parts XXXI-XXXVI (p 169-end)

(optional: supplement with The Citizen Reader by Forster, if desired )

Canada/U.K.

We recommend The Citizen Reader by Forster for its coverage of topics not normally found in citizenship books. This is an old book and has not been updated; be aware that there is colonialism in it and there may be wording we find offensive today. We recommend that you read this with your student and discuss the topics, not only because of its age but also to help further understanding and bring the topics to life with discussion and examples. Not everything will apply to Canadian families, but you should be able to extrapolate enough to make it worthwhile and explain the differences.

  • Term 1:

The Citizen Reader by H. O. Arnold-Forster, p 120-161

  • Term 2:

P 161-190

  • Term 3:

P 190-224

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Geography


Geography

6 map questions to be answered before each lesson (examples in Form IIB).  Map questions to be answered from map and from memory before each lesson; then reading and narrations; children to make memory sketch maps.  All Geography to be learned with map.

  • Term 1

— Richard Halliburton’s Marvels of the Orient, ch XVI-XX (Zenobia to Wonderland) (avail from Living Books Press)
The Further Adventures of Nils by Selma Lagerlof Ch 7-10
[or alternatively, Travels with Gannon and Wyatt: Great Bear Rainforest by Patti Wheeler]

  • Term 2

— Richard Halliburton’s Marvels of the Orient, ch XXI-XXIV (My Hindu Princess to The Top of the World)
— The Further Adventures of Nils  Ch 11-15 [alternatively, have a light term, or continue local geography study from IIB]

  • Term 3

— Richard Halliburton’s Marvels of the Orient, ch XXV to end (Land of Mystery to The Magic Mountain)
— Further Adventures of Nils  Ch 16-end [or, alternatively, A Long Walk to Water by Linda Sue Park]

*Note:  This will be our 3rd year reading Nils.  If you are coming to Wildwood late, or you are tired of this book and want a change, use the alternate suggestion instead]

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Natural History, etc

Each term:

— Keep a Nature Notebook, see Home Education p 54,55

— Countryside Rambles by Furneaux (Yesterday’s Classics) or another nature study book may be used.

— Experiments must be done. Use a simple science experiments book such as Junk Drawer Engineering by Bobby Mercer.

[Optional but highly recommended, to be read in leisure time: George’s Secret Key to the Universe by Stephen and Lucy Hawking]

  • Term 1

— Life and Her Children by Arabella Buckley, p 103-134

— Isaac Asimov’s Guide to Earth and Space, sections 52-69

— Make special outdoor studies according to the season and climate, with drawings and notes, e.g. wild fruits, spiders (Countryside Rambles by Furneaux for wild fruits, or another nature study book may be used)

  • Term 2

— Life and Her Children, p 135-166

— Isaac Asimov’s Guide to Earth and Space, sections 71-92

— Make special outdoor studies according to the season and climate, with drawings and notes, e.g. clouds

  • Term 3

— Life and Her Children, p 167-200

— Isaac Asimov’s Guide to Earth and Space, sections 93-end

— Make special outdoor studies according to the season and climate, with drawings and notes, e.g. climbing plants and plant protection (Countryside Rambles)

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Picture Study

Follow current term’s choices for picture study, or choose your own artist to study.

Begin with biographical information and information on the artist’s style (Impressionist, etc), given as an object lesson if there are no short books available.

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Arithmetic

Continue with your math program of choice. Emphasize word problems, and tables and rapid oral work. The programmes introduced Algebra or Geometry along with the regular math program at this stage.

[Optional, to be read in leisure time:   The Number Devil: A Mathematical Adventure by Hans Magnus Enzensberger.]

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Latin

Continue Latin program of choice. We recommend Lingua Latina. Click here for our Latin page with instructions and recommendations.

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French/German/Spanish

Read Home Education for how to teach a second language.

Use the program of your choice, as much oral as possible. Our recommendation again is Cherrydale Press, based on the Gouin method used by Charlotte Mason. Click here for other options

Read children’s books and poems in the target language, translating with the children’s help; children afterwards narrate in the target language.

Listen to nursery rhymes and other children’s songs in the target language. Mama Lisa’s World is a good resource. Use recordings done by native speakers if possible.

Learn three songs per term in the language you are studying.

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Drawing

Teacher should consult Drawing with Children by Mona Brookes, and/or The Laws Guide to Nature Drawing and Journaling by John Muir Laws

Every term, the PNEU programmes had under Drawing to make a study of different topics. We encourage you to do the same, but instead of assigning things your student may have no interest in, we encourage you to come up with a list with your student. Some specifics that were in the PNEU programmes, to give you ideas:

  • Simple sketches from nature
  • Kitchen and garden utensils
  • Objects and furniture in the schoolroom
  • Objects in the house
  • Knights on horseback
  • Figures and horses
  • Outdoor animals and pets
  • Figures at work
  • Children at play

Additionally:

  • Term 1:

Six wild fruits, in brushdrawing. Original brushdrawings from scenes in books set for reading. Memory drawings.

Pencil should not be used.

  • Term 2:

Six twigs, in brushdrawing. Original brushdrawings from scenes in books set for reading. Memory drawings.

Pencils should not be used.

  • Term 3:

Six wild flowers. Original brushdrawings from scenes in books set for reading. Memory drawings.

Pencils should not be used.

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Recitations

Concentrate on one poet per term, but also use an anthology of other poems for variety. We recommend Classic Poetry from Candlewick Illustrated Classics.

Click here for full text of recitation selections for Form II

  • Term 1:
    • Focus Poet: Hillaire Belloc “Cautionary Tales for Children”
    • Memorize:
      — Ten Thoughts to Live By
      — You Must Read by Giovanni Boccaccio
      — Dumbledore quote
      — 1-2 poems of your student’s choice
    • Oration practice (does not need to be memorized):
      — Choose one of the following: a scene from this term’s Shakespeare selection -OR-  Lyra Heroica Nos 65 and 66 -OR- 50 lines of a dramatic selection from Lyra Heroica.
  • Term 2
    • Focus Poet: Thanha Lai “Inside Out and Back Again”
    • Memorize :
      — General Wolf Rules for Life [or] Great Expectations quote
      — Cattle die and Kinsmen die
      — Litany Against Fear
      — 1-3 poems of your student’s choice
    • Oration practice:
      Choose one of the following: a scene from this term’s Shakespeare selection; Lyra Heroica Nos 67 and 79; 50 lines of a dramatic selection from your anthology of poetry
  • Term 3
    • Focus Poet: Emily Dickenson (Poetry for Young People)
    • Memorize:
      — Humankind has not woven (Chief Seattle)
      — Jabberwocky by Lewis Carroll
      — Never Forget (R Buckminster Fuller)
      — 1-2 poems of your student’s choice
    • Oration practice: a scene from this term’s Shakespeare selection -or- 50 lines from your poetry anthology

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Reading  (including holiday and evening reading)

Books set for geography, history, and recitations should afford exercise in careful reading. Some new words to be visualized every day.

  • Term 1
    • Bulfinch’s Mythology Ch XII-XV
    • Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling
    • The Birchbark House by Louise Ehrdich (historical fiction)
    • This term’s Shakespeare selection
  • Term 2
    • Bulfinch’s Mythology Ch XVI – XIX
    • Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson — OR — The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle by Avi
    • Elijah of Buxton by Christopher Paul Curtis (historical fiction)
    • This term’s Shakespeare selection
  • Term 3
    • Bulfinch’s Mythology Ch XX – XXIII “Admetus & Alcestis”
    • The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
    • The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate by Jacqueline Kelly  (historical fiction) — OR — The Wheel on the School by Meindert DeJong
    • This term’s Shakespeare selection

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Music

Continue instrument lessons. Learning from a teacher in-person is generally the best way, but we understand that many of us are unable to do this, whether due to budget or other constraints.

This page from Charlotte Mason Help has good ideas for how to learn an instrument on a limited budget: Learn to Play Piano on a Shoestring  

Resources:

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Musical Appreciation

Use this term’s selection from the Composer Rotation, or choose your own to study.

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 Singing

Learn this term’s selections of songs, or choose your own.

Remember to also learn three songs in your foreign language.

The PNEU programmes had resources for sight singing with the Curwen method, to be worked through slowly.

Go to our Singing Sol-fa page for more information and resources.

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Drill

Continue with yoga and drill in good manners.

If yoga is a sticking point for you, look at the Form II Options page for other ideas.

Click here for a list of manners to drill, if you are stuck for ideas.

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Work

Helpful resources for all terms (more resources here):

Gardening Lab for Kids by Renata Brown
Martha Stewart’s Favorite Crafts for Kids by the editors of Martha Stewart Living

  •  Term 1

— Help in house or garden
— machine sewing: elastic waist pajama bottoms (shorts or pants)
— mend clothes from the wash each week
— make gifts for the winter holidays
— whittling
— (optional) Cardboard Sloyd: 4 models

  • Term 2

— Help in house or garden
— machine sewing: pajama top
— mend clothes from the wash each week
tablet weaving
— (optional) Cardboard Sloyd: 4 models

 

  • Term 3

— Help in house or garden
— machine sewing: zipper: duffel bag or simple dress
— mend clothes from the wash each week
— Family craft: bird house (older students build, younger students help paint and decorate)
— Service Project:  Regularly visit a “grandfriend” at a nursing home, assisted living facility, or in the neighborhood. Play card games, do crafts together, teach each other new skills, make up stories, and build a real connection.
— (optional) Cardboard Sloyd: 4 models

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World Religions, Philosophy and Logic
Charlotte Mason’s original curriculum included comprehensive Bible readings alongside optional Sunday readings. Wildwood encourages each family to include books on their own spiritual traditions, and as those are so plentiful, it would be impossible for us to include them all. As an alternative, we offer some suggestions for those who may be interested in readings on World Religions, Philosophy or Logic.

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N.B. (nota bene — take special notice)

Taken directly from the PNEU programmes for Form II:

  • In home schoolrooms where there are children in A as well as in B both Forms may work together, doing the work of A or B as they are able, but more work must be expected from A. Children will be two years in II.A. (ages, say, 10-12).
  • In Grammar (English and foreign) and in mathematics there must be no gaps.
  • For methods of teaching the various subjects see Home Education by C. M. Mason. [also, A Philosophy of Education]
  • Members are asked to remember that an average child should cover the whole programme suitable for his age; also that provision is made for holiday and evening reading, occupations and hobbies.